Review and Interview: Adam Meadors and Sam Romesburg of Among the Willows

Who writes a western nowadays?

Years ago, westerns were the genre that ensured success among T.V. viewers – even Star Trek was pretty much a western in space.  People were drawn to the rugged adventure of a new frontier, and the stories of the tough characters that lived there.

Dawson and Mathis finding themselves at the business end of several angry card players.
Dawson and Mathis finding themselves at the business end of several angry card players’ guns.

Nowadays you’d be hard pressed to find a western story that isn’t somehow fused with another genre – western/sci fi being a popular course to take with shows like “Westworld” and “Firefly.”  That’s one of the reasons Adam Meadors and Sam Romesburg teamed up to create their comic Among the Willows.

I admit, I’ve never been truly excited for the genre – it’s always flown under my radar for the most part – but this comic piqued my interest.

The story starts out a little slow as it sets up the world and characters, dropping two best friends and their families on either side of the lines drawn by the civil war.  Yet despite these divisions, readers are treated to what appears to be a lasting, tight-knit friendship between two square-jawed cowboys that looks like it goes back years.

While not all of the backstory is provided right off the bat, the framework for the story is set up in a way that allows (hopefully) for loose ends to be picked up and run with later in the series.  The main characters, Mathis and Dawson, immediately fill the roles of scruffy, likeable rogues as any white-hatted hero should be.

Mathis learns a lesson from his father at an early age.
Mathis learns a lesson from his father at an early age.

The comic itself mostly follows general tropes for the majority of the first issue, but ends with a vaguely Walking Dead-ish hook that raises more questions than it answers.  Color me intrigued.

As if adding ambience to the setting, the art for the comic makes used of muted, neutral tones without entirely washing out the color.  It makes for a visually appealing look, without over using the sepia.

Overall, I am curious to see where this comic goes.  It’s laying the foundation for a chain of events linking each book to the next with just enough answers to keep the reader reaching for another.  If the creators can keep this up, Among the Willows has the potential to bring plenty of readers into their saloon.

Want to hear more from the writers?  Listen in!

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